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Chaim Gross Portrait

Chaim Gross Portrait Chaim Gross Portrait Chaim Gross Portrait Chaim Gross Portrait

Chaim Gross

Born:
Wolowa, Austria 1904

Died:
New York, New York 1991

Photo Caption:
Chaim Gross in his studio, Peter A. Juley & Son Collection, Smithsonian American Art Museum J0017924

Photo Caption:
Originally photographed by Alfredo Valente. Image is courtesy of the Alfredo Valente papers, 1941-1978, in the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Photo Caption:
Chaim Gross in his studio at work on Harvest, ca. 1938-1939, Peter A. Juley & Son Collection, Smithsonian American Art Museum J0017898

Photo Caption:
Eugenie Gershoy, Chaim Gross, 1969, bronze, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of Chaim and Rene Gross 1970.75

Photo Caption:
Eugenie Gershoy, Chaim Gross, 1969, bronze, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of Chaim and Rene Gross 1970.75

Biography

Born in Austria, Gross studied in Budapest and Vienna before settling in the United States in 1921. Gross sculpted in wood, using a direct carving technique. He is best known for his semi-abstract interpretations of the human form.

Joan Stahl American Artists in Photographic Portraits from the Peter A. Juley & Son Collection (Washington, D.C. and Mineola, New York: National Museum of American Art and Dover Publications, Inc., 1995)

Additional Biographies

Luce Artist Biography

Chaim Gross is best remembered as one of America’s foremost sculptors, known for his hardwood carvings, figurative sculptures, and graphic work. He is also considered one of the pioneers of the direct carving method. Born in Wolowa (now part of Poland), Gross immigrated to the United States in 1921 and was quickly embraced by New York’s artists, including Elie Nadelman, another Jewish émigré. He studied at the Beaux-Arts Institute of Design with Nadelman, and the Art Students League with Robert Laurent. Gross carved families, children at play, and the acrobats that came to his small town of Wolowa in the summer. He worked almost exclusively in hardwoods because they reminded him of his father, a lumberjack who whittled small figurines in his spare time.