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Paul Wayland Bartlett Portrait

Paul Wayland Bartlett Portrait

Paul Wayland Bartlett

Also Known as: Paul W. Bartlett

Born:
New Haven, Connecticut 1865

Died:
Paris, France 1925

Photo Caption:
Paul Wayland Bartlett in his studio, Peter A. Juley & Son Collection, Smithsonian American Art Museum J0056864

Photo Caption:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Mrs. Armistead Peter III, 1958

Biography

Sculptor. Son of the minor sculptor Truman Howe Bartlett, the artist trained in France with Emmanuel Frémiet and became an eminent Beaux Arts sculptor. Well-known examples of his work are the equestrian Lafayette (1899–1908), donated by the United States to France, and the pediment of the west wing of the U.S. Capitol.

Joan Stahl American Artists in Photographic Portraits from the Peter A. Juley & Son Collection (Washington, D.C. and Mineola, New York: National Museum of American Art and Dover Publications, Inc., 1995)

Additional Biographies

Paul Wayland Bartlett was born in NewHaven, Connecticut, in 1865, the son of the minor sculptor Truman Howe Bartlett. When Bartlett was nine years old, theBartlett family moved to France. Bartlett studied art at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris, where he developed an affinity for sculpting animals. His Bear Tamer received an honorable mention at the Salon in Paris in1887; Indian Ghost Dancer was admired for its exacting anatomy at the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893. Bartlett became one of the prominent Beaux-Arts artists of his day, maintaining sculpture studios in Paris, New York, and Washington, D.C. Major examples of his work include the equestrian statue of the Marquis de Lafayette (1899–1908), donated by the United States to France, and the west wing of the U.S. Capitol. The artist died in Paris in 1925.

National Museum of American Art (CD-ROM) (New York and Washington D.C.: MacMillan Digital in cooperation with the National Museum of American Art, 1996)