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Salome

1915 Paul Manship Born: St. Paul, Minnesota 1885 Died: New York, New York 1966 Roman Bronze Works (Founder) bronze 18 1/2 x 13 5/8 x 10 3/8 in. (47.0 x 34.6 x 26.4 cm.) Smithsonian American Art Museum Bequest of Paul Manship 1966.47.34 Not currently on view


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In the New Testament, Salome is King Herod's beautiful stepdaughter. Herod was so entranced with Salome that he offered her anything "unto the half of my kingdom" if she performed the Dance of the Seven Veils for his birthday (Mark 6:21). John the Baptist had angered Salome by rejecting her, and after she performed her seductive dance she asked Herod for John's head on a silver platter. This biblical story of royal intrigue, sex, and murder has inspired many artists, including composer Richard Strauss and author Oscar Wilde, whose 1893 stage version was banned in England for more than thirty years. Here, Salome's elaborate drapery and long limbs lead the viewer's eye to the decapitated head, emphasizing her bittersweet victory over the prophet.

Keywords

Performing arts - dance

Religion - New Testament - Salome

Religion - saint - St. John the Baptist

State of being - death - execution

sculpture

metal - bronze

About Paul Manship

Born: St. Paul, Minnesota 1885 Died: New York, New York 1966

About Roman Bronze Works

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Paul Manship

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