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One of the Figures at the Parterre d'Eau

ca. 1911 or 1913 Carroll Beckwith Born: Hannibal, Missouri 1852 Died: New York, New York 1917 oil on wood 10 1/2 x 8 1/2 in. (26.7 x 21.6 cm.) Smithsonian American Art Museum Transfer from Cooper-Hewitt Museum of Decorative Arts and Design, Smithsonian Institution 1974.69.4 Smithsonian American Art Museum
Luce Foundation Center, 3rd Floor, 5A


Luce Center Quote

“[I] am now thinking of Versailles and wondering if I cannot paint something there in the park that would be interesting.” Carroll Beckwith, 1911, quoted in Franchi and Weber, Intimate Revelations: The Art of Carroll Beckwith (1852-1917), 1999

Luce Center Label

Carroll Beckwith painted this work on one of his two trips to Versailles, France, where he created about twenty-two paintings of garden statues. This painting was an outdoor study, which allowed Beckwith to focus on the colorful effects of light on the sculpture and the landscape. The greenish tint of the statue may also be the result of its deterioration. When Beckwith was in France, the government had recognized the dilapidation of the once glorious palace, and was moving to restore Versailles to its original splendor. (Franchi and Weber, Intimate Revelations: The Art of Carroll Beckwith (1852-1917), 1999)

Keywords

Figure female - nude

Landscape - France - Versailles

Monument - fountain - Parterre d'Eau

Monument - statue

painting

About Carroll Beckwith

Born: Hannibal, Missouri 1852 Died: New York, New York 1917

More works in the collection by
Carroll Beckwith