Larger Type
Smaller Type

Search Collections

Le Duc de Liancourt

ca.1794-1797 Charles Willson Peale Born: Maryland 1741 Died: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1827 watercolor on ivory 1 5/8 x 1 3/8 in. (4.1 x 3.4 cm) oval Smithsonian American Art Museum Museum purchase 1974.87 Not currently on view


Luce Center Label

A staunch advocate of the French Revolution, Liancourt (1747-1827) was considered the French equivalent to Benjamin Franklin. He was part of Lafayette’s entourage, and became friends with George Washington, as both men were farmers interested in new agricultural techniques. Nancy Shippen, a prominent Philadelphian, recorded his remark on American democracy: “In the days of my power, under the ancient régime of France, I had fifty servants to wait upon me, but yet my coat was never as well brushed as now that I do it myself.” Liancourt wrote a two-volume book titled Travels through the United States of North America, the Country of the Iroquois and Upper Canada in the years 1795, 1796, and 1797, in which he recorded his experiences. His published memoirs made him one of France’s most respected authors.

Keywords

Portrait male - Liancourt, Duc de - bust

painting - miniature

paint - watercolor

ivory

About Charles Willson Peale

Born: Maryland 1741 Died: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1827

More works in the collection by
Charles Willson Peale