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ca. 1926 Walter Ufer Born: Louisville, Kentucky 1876 Died: Santa Fe, New Mexico 1936 oil on canvas 50 1/2 x 50 1/2 in. (128.4 x 128.4 cm.) Smithsonian American Art Museum Gift of Mr. and Mrs. R. Crosby Kemper, Jr. 1984.66 Smithsonian American Art Museum
2nd Floor, North Wing


Gallery Label

This painting captures an everyday, yet deeply poetic moment among New Mexico's Pueblo Indians. Ufer was a German √©migr√© who brought to America an intense sympathy for ordinary people instilled in him by his socialist family. He did not romanticize his sitters, because he understood that the Indian "resents being regarded as a curiosity—as a dingleberry on a tree." The two men on horseback pay their respects to a woman who lives, like millions of Americans, behind a picket fence. Their costumes show that they have held on to their tribal culture. Not long after Anglo Americans had effectively reduced the Pueblo tribes to touristic curiosities, Ufer quietly underscored the human dignity of a timeless ritual of courtship.

Exhibition Label, Smithsonian American Art Museum, 2006

Keywords

Equestrian

Ethnic - Indian

Figure female - full length

Figure(s) in exterior - domestic

painting

paint - oil

fabric - canvas

About Walter Ufer

Born: Louisville, Kentucky 1876 Died: Santa Fe, New Mexico 1936

More works in the collection by
Walter Ufer

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