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Geronimo by Elbridge Ayer Burbank / American Art
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Geronimo

1899 Elbridge Ayer Burbank Born: Harvard, Illinois 1858 Died: San Francisco, California 1949 oil on board 12 x 10 in. (30.4 x 25.4 cm) Smithsonian American Art Museum Given in memory of Doris and James Snell, friends of the artist 2000.68 Smithsonian American Art Museum
Luce Foundation Center, 4th Floor, 32B



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Geronimo



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Geronimo was a medicine man and highly respected Apache leader who fought to protect his tribe from the government’s Indian policies. He avoided capture several times, but in 1886 he surrendered and was sent with other Apaches to a reservation at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. Thereafter, he served as a government scout, worked as a farmer, and joined the Dutch Reformed Church. He was a public figure who participated in Buffalo Bill’s Wild West touring show, Theodore Roosevelt’s inauguration, and the St. Louis World’s Fair. Elbridge Ayer Burbank’s uncle Edward Everett Ayer commissioned the artist to paint portraits of Native Americans, and Geronimo was his first subject. In this half-length painting, Burbank showed Geronimo in profile. The great Apache seems still to be on guard, turning warily to confront an approaching visitor. (Truettner, ed., The West As America: Reinterpreting Images of the Frontier, 1820-1920, 1991)

Keywords

Ethnic - Indian - Apache

Occupation - other - chief

Portrait male - Geronimo - bust

painting

About Elbridge Ayer Burbank

Born: Harvard, Illinois 1858 Died: San Francisco, California 1949

More works in the collection by
Elbridge Ayer Burbank