Fighters for Freedom

Harriet Tubman

Harriet
After her own escape from slavery in 1849, Harriet Tubman (1821–1913) began helping other African-American slaves flee to the northern states and Canada. She used a loosely constructed and secret network of escape routes and people called the Underground Railroad. Her dangerous forays into the South resulted in freedom for more than two hundred slaves. Johnson's expressive portrait of Harriet Tubman includes references to the secretive and treacherous nature of the Underground Railroad.
Harriet Tubman
about 1945
oil on paperboard
73.5 x 59.3 cm
(29 3/8 x 23 3/8 in.)
Gift of the Harmon Foundation

LOOK! THINK! IMAGINE!

Explore these Web sites to find out more about Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad. How did Harriet Tubman get the nickname "Moses"? What hardships and difficulties did slaves face as they were fleeing to freedom by way of the Underground Railroad? Can you find a map of the routes of the Underground Railroad? Are any of these routes located near your town?


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