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John Ross Dix,
from Amusing and Thrilling Adventures of a California Artist While Daguerreotyping a Continent Amid Burning Deserts, Savages, and Perpetual Snows, And a Poetical Companion to the Pantoscope of California, Nebraska & Kansas, Salt Lake & the Mormons. From 1500 Daguerreotypes by J. Wesley Jones, Esq., 1854

Notices of the Artists, by the California Press. Daguerreotypes of California

We announced some months since, that a large company has been formed under the direction of J. Wesley Jones, Esq., to Daguerreotype the grand and diversified scenery, of this golden land, its Diggings, and Towns, and Cities, for the purpose of producing for the edification and amusement of our Atlantic brethren, a perfect view of California as it is. We spoke then of the magnitude of the undertaking, and the great outlay, and energy necessary to carry it through, and congratulated the company, and the public on the appointment of Mr. Jones to the Presidency of the enterprise; assuring them, that however hazardous and dangerous the undertaking if it was within the province of human energy and genius, to carry it through, it would be done—and done well!

From our correspondents, however, in different parts, we occasionly heard, with pleasure of the artist's triumph, but were scarcely prepared for such an Exhibition of Daguerreotypes, of the richest and rarest scenery of our "Eden-land," as has been opened before us to-day. Mr. Jones has more than equalled our expectations. He has gathered a collection of choice views, which give one a perfect view of California, in her every phase, her mountains,—her valleys,—her forests,—ravines,—her towns and cities;—and her aboriginal and adopted inhabitants. To obtain these pictures, he has climbed mountains; swam rivers, and suffered privations and toils, almost incredible. With pleasure, we record his astonishing perseverance, and his triumphs. His view of California is complete, and truthful,we can testify.

There remains the Overland Route to be Daguerreotyped. A company is already organized. And away will go our energetic friend, to brave new dangers, and win new laurels. The Indians are now troublesome along the "Carson," and Humboldt rivers. But Mr. Jones presses on, and we doubt not will complete the enterprise, for "he knows no such word as fail."

Mr. Jones has been well tried in California, and has established an enviable reputation. As Deputy U. S. Marshal, he was decidedly efficient, enforcing the law where others failed;—as a merchant, he has been prompt, and business-like;—as an orator before the people, and the court, he is eloquent and popular;—as an artist, and manager he is certainly skilful and energetic; and as a writer his numerous articles in the California Press, "Inkling's on the trail of the Census Man," &c., &c., have gained him an honorable reputation.

His rare versatility of talent, admirably adapt him for California life, and we regret his departure. In his new and dangerous journey, he has our well wishes; and many hearts here will beat high to hear of his safe arrival in the "States." May the same good fortune attend him always that has attended him here—for he deserves a fortune!From the Placer Times and Transcript.

With a few friends, we had the pleasure to-day of examining an extensive collection of beautiful Daguerreotypes, and sketches, representing nearly every prominent point in California scenery, mines and cities. It is needless to say that they are true to nature; for the Daguerreotype cannot fail to produce things as they really are. But we were truly astonished at the great number and variety of the views,—at the excellence of their artistic execution, and the vast toil, and expense which has been lavished in obtaining them. The object is to illustrate California perfectly,—both in a panorama of large proportions, and high finish, and in a written work descriptive of the country, its people and resources. The enterprise is a gigantic and a laudable one, and is being carried out thoroughly, and efficiently. J. Wesley Jones, Esq., the leading artist and projector, though a young man, is favorably known to our citizens, as a writer, an officer, and a merchant,—of a fine order of talents and great energy of purpose. He is well fitted to accomplish this hazardous undertaking, and we wish him God speed! and a safe journey over the dangerous Indian country he is about to traverse. Together with a full realization of his fervent hopes, and a handsome renumeration for his toils.—Sacramento Daily Union.


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