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"The Hillotype"
Humphrey's Journal, August 1856

The Hillotype is now exciting much attention among our country operators, some of whom have contributed the sum of twenty-five dollars for a work to be published giving a full account of the great secret in detail. We sincerely regret that we cannot see the least possible chance of the purchasers getting their money back. We are informed by a competent judge, that the pictures shown to him were not of a character to give the least satisfaction to the practitioner; but he was told that "they were not the best, the finest being locked up in a safe at Westkill," or some other place. Now, it does not look reasonable to us that Mr. Hill has good pictures and will not show them, particularly at the time when it is desirable to make a favorable impression on the public mind.

Again, it appears ridiculous that a man having one of the most magnificent Processes ever discovered, and worth "two hundred thousand dollars," and "one which will supersede all others," should issue said Process in a book which is to be illustrated with common photographs, and giving the Collodion and Ambrotype Processes.

We are grieved to feel that the Hillotype has nothing in it worthy the attention of those who are dependent upon their daily labor for support. We shall be pleased if at any future time it should become practical. This we do not believe is the case at present; and none who have not the means to spend in experimenting should send their money for the Book. We look upon the matter in its present shape as a mere speculation on the part of any one who may choose to purchase the work.


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