Exhibitions

Pop Art Prints


Pop art is bold and brash. The subjects are familiar, the forms flat. The lines are crisp and the images clear. But in spite of its apparent simplicity, pop art transforms images lifted directly from advertising, news reports, and highway signs into sly commentaries on consumerism, our fascination with glamour, and the superficiality of contemporary American mass culture.

Pop art emerged in stark contrast to the emotional intensity of abstract expressionism, then the reigning movement in contemporary art. Pop's banal subject matter and commercial references startled viewers. Pizza? A comic book frame? A movie star? Pin-up girls? Art lovers had always assumed that high art and popular culture were oppositional concepts—until Jasper Johns, Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Rauschenberg, Andy Warhol, and others of their generation challenged prevailing assumptions about what fine art should be.

The first pop art show took New York by storm when it opened in October 1962, and within a year museums all over the country clamored to exhibit the new art. The artists became overnight art stars, and collectors lined up in droves to buy their work. Tom Wesselman later remarked that money "just came roaring in."

Printmaking was an ideal medium for pop artists. Screen printing and lithography were commercial techniques well-suited both to reproducing magazine, newspaper, and comic strip images and to eliminating the hand in favor of a mechanical process.

This installation of pop art prints features the range of subjects and styles associated with the movement. The works in this exhibition are drawn entirely from the museum's collection. This slide show includes selected images from the installation; due to rights restrictions, they will be available online only through the exhibition period, which ends August 31, 2014.




Jim Dine
Awl, from the portfolio 11 Pop Artists,
Volume I

1965

Jim Dine
Toothbrushes #2/19485003
1962

Jim Dine
Untitled, from the portfolio A Tool Box
1966

Jim Dine
Untitled, from the portfolio A Tool Box
1985

Jim Dine
Untitled, from the portfolio A Tool Box
1966

Robert Indiana
Eternal Hexagon, from the portfolio Ten Works x Ten Painters
1964

Robert Indiana
The Figure 5, from the portfolio Decade
1971

Robert Indiana
Love
1967

Roy Lichtenstein
Haystacks #3
1969

Roy Lichtenstein
Moonscape, from the portfolio 11 Pop Artists, Volume I

Roy Lichtenstein
Reverie, from the portfolio 11 Pop Artists, Volume II
1965

Roy Lichtenstein
Sweet Dreams, Baby!, from the portfolio 11 Pop Artists, Volume III
1965

Claes Oldenburg
Flying Pizza, from the portfolio New York Ten
1964

Claes Oldenburg
Pile of Erasers
1975

Claes Oldenburg
Tea Bag, from the portfolio Four on Plexiglas
1965—66

Andy Warhol
Jackie II, from the portfolio 11 Pop Artists, Volume II
1965

Andy Warhol
Jackie III, from the portfolio 11 Pop Artists, Volume III
1966

Andy Warhol
Marilyn
1967

Andy Warhol
Untitled (Birmingham, Alabama), from the portfolio Ten Works x Ten Painters
1964




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