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Charles Livingston Bull (1874–1932)
U.S. Food Administration
Save the Products of the Land: Eat More Fish—They Feed Themselves, 1918
offset lithograph
76 x 51 cm (30 x 20 in.)
National Museum of American History Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution
photographed by Larry Gates

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Biography of Charles Livingston Bull

Charles Livingston Bull, one of the most prolific and accomplished American wildlife illustrators, received his artistic training at the Philadelphia Art School. He also worked as a taxidermist and was known as an expert in the field of bird and animal anatomy. Bull often sketched at the Bronx Zoo and traveled widely in search of wildlife subjects. He was a strong advocate of biological protection and preservation, creating many images to arouse public support for endangered species such as the bald eagle. He also illustrated a number of important books, including the first edition of Jack London's Call of the Wild. Bull's work appeared in a great many magazines and other periodicals throughout his career.

Bull brought his skill in animal illustration to poster design. Although committed to wildlife illustration, he was able to adapt his style to the needs of commercial poster design and succeeded in creating some of the most enduring images of the first half of the twentieth century. Among his most famous posters are those made for Barnum & Bailey circus and his effort during World War I to sell savings stamps. Bull also designed posters for a number of federal government departments as part of the war effort.

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