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Saul Bass (1920–1996)
Vertigo, 1958
lithograph
50.8 x 71.1 cm (20 x 28 in.)
Pacific Film Archives, University Art Museum, University of California at Berkeley
© 1997 by Universal City Studios, Inc. Courtesy of MCA Publishing Rights, a Division of Universal Studios, Inc., all rights reserved

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Biography of Saul Bass

Saul Bass, a native of New York City, was educated at the Art Students League and then studied with Gyorgy Kepes at Brooklyn College. Bass was enormously influenced by Kepes, from whom he learned the basic elements of design and developed a growing sense of humanism in the visual arts. After working for a number of advertising agencies, Bass established the design consulting firm Saul Bass and Associates in 1952. During his career, Bass worked for both major corporations and smaller enterprises and was responsible for some of this century's most enduring emblems, including the AT&T globe logo.

In addition to creating posters and prints, Bass was very active in the field of motion pictures. He designed promotional material for studios and soon began creating on-screen graphic sequences that, like his corporate designs, were major innovative advances in the field. Bass also wrote and directed a number of short films and directed the now famous shower scene in the film Psycho.

Aside from its widespread public presence, Bass's graphic work has been exhibited in museums throughout the United States and Europe, including the Museum of Modern Art and the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum in New York, as well as the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. The recipient of numerous design awards, Bass was also recognized for his excellence in motion-picture making.

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