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Peter Gee (born 1932)
Martin Luther King Jr., 1968
photo silkscreen on foil paper
76.2 x 48.3 cm (30 x 19 in.)
Mary Haskell

Peter Gee's juxtaposition of positive and negative photographic images of Martin Luther King Jr. suggests a visual commentary on public perception of the slain civil rights leader during his lifetime. Jailed repeatedly for leading nonviolent protests against racist policies and practices during the 1960s, here King appears to be looking beyond the prison bars in a moment of quiet personal reflection.

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Biography of Peter Gee

English by birth, Peter Gee has spent his career working in New York City and is the founder of the ApoGee Gallery there. While working with Milton Glaser at the famous Push Pin Studios in New York in the 1960s, Gee created some of the decade's most characteristic images. These works often dealt with the many controversial issues of the day, including the Vietnam War and the civil rights movement. Gee has executed a variety of public and private commissions throughout his career. His work has been featured in major exhibitions in many cities and museums, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and the Smithsonian Institution. Gee is also the recipient of numerous design and graphic awards.

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