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Harold Garrison
WATER GATE OR GOVERNMENT MACHINE NO. 3
1974
ink on wood with leather and metal
13 3/4 x 15 x 3 1/2 in.
Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of Herbert Waide Hemphill, Jr. and museum purchase made possible by Ralph Cross Johnson



In his art and in his life Garrison speaks out against governmental waste and corruption. This machine, he said, does everything the government does but in a fraction of the time, and for much less money. When the trigger is pulled, the Democratic donkey and the Republican elephant rock back and forth on the "hee-haw see-saw"; an arrow "shows where Henry Kissinger goes, not what he promises"; Sam Ervin emerges from obscurity; the White House tapes appear; Nixon resigns; Gerald Ford takes the oath of office; a street sign for Pennsylvania Avenue unfolds; taxes rise; and a door marked "Water Gate" opens to reveal spotted bugs in the "bug house."