Exhibitions

Watch This! Revelations in Media Art

FILM
MUSIC
VIDEO
COMPUTERS
LENS
LANGUAGE
TIME
CHANCE
BODY
FILM and CINEMA
MUSIC and SOUND
VIDEO and TELEVISION
COMPUTERS
LENS, CAMERA and PERSPECTIVE
LANGUAGE, POETRY and LITERATURE
TIME, DURATION and SEQUENCE
CHANCE
BODY, THE FIGURE and PERFORMANCE

The second half of the 20th century introduced an array of technologies and electronic phenomena that sent humanity careening down a path of relentless acceleration toward futurity, and with it, set art in motion. Innovations in hi-fidelity stereo, broadcast television, videotape, orbital satellites, computer systems, video games and cellular communications, index a frenetic pace of social change from the 1940s and into the present. ...click here to read more

Cinema and moving image film as we know them are late 19th century inventions. Professional studio cameras and cinema's 35mm film standard are large, unwieldy contraptions. They are quite expensive to operate. Making moving images was exceedingly difficult without professional studio assets and production assistants. It wasn't until the early twentieth century that the 16mm film gage was created as an inexpensive, alternative moving image format intended for amateur use. ...click here to read more

Classical music is a recurring springboard for radical interventions in the performing and visual arts, and musicians are often the first to challenge tradition. Representing the political and social superstructure of "high culture", rigid instrumentation and traditional compositions of orchestral music have repeatedly been targeted by a creative class seeking to disrupt conventions and repossess modes of expression. ...click here to read more

Live distribution and corporate broadcast mechanisms established by radio were built over decades, precipitating those used for television. But the sudden and accelerating televisual saturation of American culture has not been subtle. Its impact was immediate and noticeable from the outset. During the Second World War there were only about 40,000 TV sets in use, most of which were located in and around New York City. ...click here to read more

While our interaction with computers today may mostly occur from social or consumer perspectives, through Amazon, Wikipedia, Google Maps and video games, the computer's origins are inextricably linked to the military industrial complex. Mainframe computers and the languages articulated for them are the invention of research centers largely funded by the United States Army and the Pentagon. ...click here to read more

The camera - mechanical, electronic and optical devices used to capture images and sound - has had a profound affect on visual culture. Artists have engaged cameras from both sides of the lens to examine and redefine ideas of perspective, composition, surveillance and representation.

Language is a key component in contemporary art practices. In terms of media art, language is engaged not only through poems, literature and performance, but through the computer programs, digital scripts and electronic codes embedded in our machines. Artistic variations on text, semiotics, and storytelling ascribe images with meaning and further expand cultural literacy.

Media artists have expanded the physical dimensions of their practice beyond height, width, and depth to included the added dimension of duration. Technology and electronic phenomena have enabled the capture, recording and re-sequencing of events, empowering artists to consider new material and conceptual representations of time in revealing ways.

The unknown and the unpredictable have inspired artists from time immemorial. Elements of chance and indeterminacy are incorporated into media art practices as a conceptual strategy that anticipates new relationships among images, sounds and ideas.

The reality of the figure and the body remain central themes in the practice of media artists. The experience and sensation of their work is often located in a physical exchange with the technologies we encounter and touches on issues of representation, authority, consciousness and presence in the worlds we inhabit both physically and virtually.

2005
single-channel video installation, high definition, color, sound
09:58 minutes
dimensions variable
40:00 minutes
Takeshi Murata
Monster movie
2005
single-channel video, color, sound
4:19 minutes
Robert Watts, David Behrman, Bob Diamond
Cloud Music
1974-79
hybrid sound/video installation with custom electronics
Kota Ezawa
LYAM 3D
2008
single channel video, color, silent
03:46 minutes
Igor Kopystiansky, Svetlana Kopystiansky
Yellow Sound
2005
single channel video, black and white, silent
4:33 minutes

The Big Business Man smiled. "Time," he said, "is what keeps everything from happening at once."

Raymond Cummings, The Girl in the Golden Atom. 1922

Raphael Montañez Ortiz
Golf
1957
16 mm film, black and white, sound
01:59 minutes
Bruce Nauman
Art Make Up
1967-68
four-channel video, 16 mm film on video, color, sound
40:00 minutes
Buky Schwartz
Painted Projection
1977
interactive closed-circuit video installation
dimensions variable
Hans Breder
Quanta
1967
single channel video, color, silent
03:46 minutes
Nam June Paik
T.V. Clock
1963/81
digital animation, color, silent
04:00 minutes
Rico Gatson
Gun Play
2001
single-channel video, color, sound
02:35 minutes
Eve Sussman and Rufus Corporation
Yuri′s Office
2009-10
movie set installation
9 x 14 x 14 ft.
Dwinell Grant
Contrathemis
1941
16mm film, color, silent
08:00 minutes
Bill Beirne
Cross Reference
1976
two channel video installation, color, sound
32:00 minutes
2009
custom electronics, 1728 LEDs, mounted duratrans diffusion screen
33 x 44 x 15 in.
Sadie Benning
Living Inside
1989
video, black and white, sound
5:10 minutes
Romy Achituv, Camille Utterback
Text Rain
1999
single-channel interactive projection
Nam June Paik
ETUDE1
1967-68
Fortran output sheet [Love/Hate/God/Dog], thermafax paper
11 x 8 in.
Steina Vasulka
Violin Power
1970-78
video, black & white, sound
10:04 minutes
Jenova Chen & Kellee Santiago
Flower
2007
video game, Sony PS3, color, sound

Give us your comments

All comments are moderated so there may be a delay in seeing your comment published. There is no need to re-post it.



"Reproduction, including downloading of the Hill and Nauman works is prohibited by copyright laws and international conventions without the express written permission of Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York."