Artists

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Welsch, Paul
Welsh, Horace Devitt
Wenderoth, August
Wendt, John R.
Wendt, William
Wengenroth, Stow

Lithographer. Although he was born in New York City, Wengenroth devoted himself to depictions of the harbors, buildings, flora and fauna of New England. A master of lithography, he won more than 30 print prizes and later published Making a Lithograph.

Wenger, John
Wentworth, Perley Meyer ("P. M.")

P. M. Wentworth expressed his interest in the stars, planets, and worlds beyond our own in his drawings, many of which have an ethereal quality and allude to Christian theology. To confirm that his concerns were not of this world, Wentworth wrote the word "imagination" on many of his works.

Wentzel, Jacobran
Wenzel, Francesco
Werger, Art
Weschler, Anita
Wesley, John
Wessel, Herman Henry
Wesselhoeft, Mary Fraser
Wesselmann, Tom
West, Benjamin

From the humble circumstances of his birth as the youngest of ten children in Pennsylvania, Benjamin West became one of the most acclaimed artists of his day.

West, Cecil
West, George William
West, Levon
Westall, Richard
Westermann, H. C.
Westermann, Joan
Westfall, Carol D.
Westlund, Harry
Weston, Brett
Weston, Edward
Weston, Harold
Weston, James P.
Westphal, Katherine
Wetmore, Debbie
Weyden, Roger van der
Weyl, Max

Born December 1, 1837, in Mühlen-am-Neckar, Germany. Immigrated with his family to Williamsport, Pa., 1853, where he was an itinerant watch and clock repairer. Lived in Washington, D.C., 1861–1914. Opened a jewelry shop at 3rd Street and Pennsylvania Avenue, 1862. Began to paint.

Wharton, David W.
Wharton, James P.
Wheeler, Nina Barr