Women Artists

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Saar, Betye

Betye Saar was born in Pasadena, California. During visits to her grandmother in the Los Angeles neighborhood of Watts, she watched as the fantastic Watts Towers were slowly being constructed by Simon Rodia out of broken glass, bottle tops, and other junk.

Safire, Helene
Sahlstrand, Margaret Ahrens
Sahme, Jean
Sahmie, Ida
Sahmie, Rachel
Saint-Phalle, Niki de
Saldamando, Shizu
Saltonstall, Elizabeth
Saltzman, Mary P. E.
Samson-Talleur, Linda
Sánchez, Judy
Sandlin, Red Weldon
Sanford, Marion
Sanín, Fanny
Santiago, Kellee
Sardeau, Helene

Belgian-born sculptor. Sardeau studied in the United States with Mahonri Young and exhibited internationally. Contemplation, serenity and humanism were often conveyed in her work.

Sauer, Jane
Sauter, Mary S.
Savage, Augusta

"I have created nothing really beautiful, really lasting, but if I can inspire one of these youngsters to develop the talent I know they possess, then my monument will be in their work."—T. R. Poston, "Augusta Savage," Metropolitan Magazine, Jan. 1935, n.p.

Savage, Naomi
Savart, M. R.
Saylan, Merryll
Scaravaglione, Concetta
Scarpace, Ramona
Scarpino, Betty
Scarville, Keisha
Schaechter, Judith
Schanz, Joanna E.
Schapira, Susan
Schapiro, Miriam
Scheer, Sherie
Scheier, Mary
Scherr, Mary Ann
Scheuer, Suzanne
Schick, Marjorie

Marjorie Schick's work is rooted in the European jewelry revolution of the 1960s when innovators, rejecting the traditional materials, techniques, and social meanings of Western jewelry, began to employ the entire human frame—not just a finger, neck, or wrist—as a point of artistic de