Empress of the Blues

  • Romare Bearden, Empress of the Blues, 1974, acrylic and pencil on paper and printed paper on paperboard, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Museum purchase in part through the Luisita L. and Franz H. Denghausen Endowment, 1996.71

Publication Label

African American Art is a rich part of the Smithsonian American Art Museum's collection, which is the largest and one of the finest in the United States. The museum began acquiring work by African American artists in the 1960s, some in depth — such as Henry Ossawa Tanner, William H. Johnson, and Alma Thomas. Many of the social, political, and cultural movements that came to define the twentieth century in America and captured the imagination of artists — such as the Jazz Age, the Harlem Renaissance, and the civil rights movement — were rooted in African American communities.

Smithsonian American Art Museum: Commemorative Guide. Nashville, TN: Beckon Books, 2015.

Title
Empress of the Blues
Artist
Date
1974
On View
Not on view.
Dimensions
36 x 48 in. (91.4 x 121.9 cm.)
Credit Line

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Museum purchase in part through the Luisita L. and Franz H. Denghausen Endowment

Mediums
Mediums Description
acrylic and pencil on paper and printed paper on paperboard
Highlights
Keywords
  • Ethnic – African-American
  • Performing arts – music – band
  • Performing arts – music – voice
  • Figure group
Object Number
1996.71
Palette
Linked Open Data
Linked Open Data URI

More from artist

More Artworks from the Collection

after 1924
oil on canvas
1974
acrylic on wood
1919
oil on paperboard
ca. 1960
acrylic and metallic paint, varnish, and pencil on paperboard