Permanent Collection — Museum Books

Christo and Jeanne-Claude: Remembering the Running Fence

Remembering the Running Fence revisits the ephemeral splendor of the remarkable outdoor installation, the Running Fence , an eighteen-foot-high white nylon fence that stretched more than twenty-four miles across Marin and Sonoma counties in northern California.

Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art

Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art explores how Latino artists shaped the artistic movements of their day and recalibrated key themes in American art and culture. This beautifully illustrated volume focuses on works created from the 1950s to the present, a turning point in our national culture that witnessed the “birth” and transformation of Latino art.

African American Art: Harlem Renaissance, The Civil Rights Movement, and Beyond

African American Art: Harlem Renaissance, Civil Rights Era, and Beyond offers a rich vision of twentieth-century visual culture. Virginia Mecklenburg, curator at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, assembled engaging entries on the one-hundred paintings, sculptures, and photographs by forty-three black artists that comprise catalogue of this exhibition. All of the artworks in the exhibition are drawn from the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s rich collection of African American art.

Temple of Invention: History of a National Landmark

This lavishly illustrated history of America’s Patent Office Building illuminates the importance of a treasured national landmark. Today the building is home to two Smithsonian museums, the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the National Portrait Gallery.

Made with Passion: The Hemphill Folk Art Collection

This in-depth look at a renowned collection, ranging from bottlecap giraffes and wood carvings to hand-sewn quilts, provides a new understanding of folk art, recognizing its achievements as an essential part of America’s visual heritage.

Craft for a Modern World

Craft for a Modern World presents 150 of the Renwick Gallery’s 2,000 artworks in a new light, celebrating the restoration and reopening of its historic landmark home. Encouraging readers to find their own connections—as they have come to expect in today’s hyperlinked world—curator Nora Atkinson describes some of her associations among these artifacts of makers, both contemporary and pioneer. Readers can engage the artworks through subtle linkages in the color plates, which introduce related works in black and white. According to Atkinson, the artworks in this catalogue, many of them newly photographed, “are a playground for the mind.”