Face Jug

  • Quillan Lanier Meaders, Face Jug, ca. 1972, glazed stoneware and stones, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of Herbert Waide Hemphill, Jr. and museum purchase made possible by Ralph Cross Johnson, 1986.65.28

Luce Center Label

The Meaders family pottery has made face jugs since it opened in 1893, using locally dug clays, foot-powered wheels, and homemade glazes. Quillan Lanier Meaders never understood the huge popularity of his face jugs, saying that the people who bought them must be "just crazy to start with" (The News and Observer, North Carolina, 1993). This piece is a devil jug, with pointed ears, slanting eyes, and small horns.

Luce Object Quote
"Well, pottery like this, the way it's done, old way, it's not a thing in the world but just man-killing work from start to finish." Quillan Lanier Meaders, 1967, The Meaders Family, North Georgia Potters, Smithsonian Folklife Studies

Title
Face Jug
Artist
Date
ca. 1972
On View
Dimensions
9 1/4 x 8 1/2 x 8 1/8 in. (23.5 x 21.6 x 20.5 cm)
Credit Line

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Gift of Herbert Waide Hemphill, Jr. and museum purchase made possible by Ralph Cross Johnson

Mediums
Mediums Description
glazed stoneware and stones
Classifications
Keywords
  • Figure – head
Object Number
1986.65.28
Palette
Linked Open Data
Linked Open Data URI

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n.d.
glazed stoneware and porcelain

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