Trevor Paglen: Sites Unseen

Thumbnail
Author
John P. Jacob and Luke Skrebowski; contributions by Wendy Hui Kyong Chun and Kate Crawford
Co-Publisher
D Giles Ltd.
Year Published
2018
Pages
252 pp.: ill (174 color and black-and-white)
ISBN Hardcover
978-1-911282-33-4
Dimensions
12 ¼ x 10 ¼ in.
Description

Trevor Paglen blurs the lines between art, science, and investigative journalism to construct unfamiliar and at times unsettling ways to see and interpret the world around us. Inspired by the landscape tradition, he captures the same horizon seen by American photographers Timothy O’Sullivan in the nineteenth century and Ansel Adams in the twentieth. Only in Paglen’s photographs is the infrastructure of surveillance also apparent—a classified military installation, a spy satellite, a tapped communications cable, a drone, an artificial intelligence.

A midcareer survey of this MacArthur Award–winning artist, this catalogue presents Paglen’s early photographic series alongside his recent sculptural objects and new work with artificial intelligence.  Curator and author John P. Jacob explores Paglen’s photographs, which show things that we are not meant to see but that Paglen considers symptomatic of our time. If those images are unsettling, Paglen’s sculptural works help us to imagine a potentially different world. Author Luke Skrebowski takes up these “impossible objects” in his probing essay.  With more than 170 illustrations, Trevor Paglen: Sites Unseen provides insight into this conceptual artist with activist intentions. Helping to better see the particular moment we live in and envisioning alternative futures are among his chief concerns.

Buy Online or write to PubOrd@si.edu Hardcover, $59.95

 

More Books

Sargent, Whistler, and Venetian Glass: American Artists and the Magic of Murano

Publisher
The Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC, in association with Princeton University Press, Princeton and Oxford
Sargent, Whistler, and Venetian Glass: American Artists and the Magic of Murano presents a broad exploration of American engagement with Venice’s art world in the late nineteenth century. During this time, Americans in Venice not only encountered a floating city of palaces, museums, and churches, but also countless shop windows filled with dazzling specimens of brightly colored glass. This lavishly illustrated book examines exquisitely crafted glass pieces alongside paintings, watercolors, and prints of the same era by American artists who found inspiration in Venice, including Frank Duveneck, Ellen Day Hale, Thomas Moran, Maria Oakey Dewing, Robert Frederick Blum, Charles Caryl Coleman, Louise Cox, Maurice Prendergast, and Maxfield Parrish, in addition to John Singer Sargent and James McNeill Whistler.

¡Printing the Revolution! The Rise and Impact of Chicano Graphics, 1965 to Now

Publisher
Publisher: Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC, in association with Princeton University Press, Princeton and Oxford
A groundbreaking look at how Chicano graphic artists and their collaborators have used their art to imagine and sustain identities and political viewpoints during the past half century.