Creamer from the Yellow Luncheon Service for Six

  • Beatrice Wood, Creamer from the Yellow Luncheon Service for Six, 1951, earthenware and glaze, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Museum purchase through the Howard Kottler Endowment for Ceramic Art, 2008.5.14

Beatrice Wood was best known for elaborate forms and shiny, iridescent glazes, known as lusters. She also created utilitarian pieces like this creamer. Wood exaggerated the creamer’s spout and handle, lending a hint of whimsy to the functional piece. The bright yellow glaze is most likely unique to this particular luncheon service. She often compared creating glazes to cooking—she took a basic formula and made slight adjustments each time, resulting in unique glazes that could not be replicated. Wood had a great sense of humor and joked later in life that she was the only person who could afford to eat off of her plates (“Luster for Life” [Beatrice Wood at Ninety-Seven], House & Garden 162, no. 6 [June 1990]).
Title
Creamer from the Yellow Luncheon Service for Six
Artist
Date
1951
Location
Dimensions
3 345 143 34 in. (9.513.49.4 cm)
Credit Line

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Museum purchase through the Howard Kottler Endowment for Ceramic Art

Mediums
Mediums Description
earthenware and glaze
Classifications
Object Number
2008.5.14
Palette
Linked Open Data
Linked Open Data URI

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