Electronic Superhighway: Continental U.S., Alaska, Hawaii

  • Nam June Paik, Electronic Superhighway: Continental U.S., Alaska, Hawaii, 1995, fifty-one channel video installation (including one closed-circuit television feed), custom electronics, neon lighting, steel and wood; color, sound, Smithsonian American Art Museum, © Nam June Paik Estate, Gift of the artist, 2002.23

Publication Label

Nam June Paik is hailed as the father of video art and is credited with the first use of the term "electronic superhighway" in the 1970s. He recognized the potential for people from all parts of the world to collaborate via media, and he knew that media would completely transform our lives. Electronic Superhighway — constructed of 336 televisions, 50 DVD players, 3,750 feet of cable, and 575 feet of multicolored neon tubing — is a testament to the ways media defined one man's understanding of a diverse nation.

Smithsonian American Art Museum: Commemorative Guide. Nashville, TN: Beckon Books, 2015.

Title
Electronic Superhighway: Continental U.S., Alaska, Hawaii
Artist
Date
1995
On View
Dimensions
approx. 15 x 40 x 4 ft.
Credit Line

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Gift of the artist

Mediums Description
fifty-one channel video installation (including one closed-circuit television feed), custom electronics, neon lighting, steel and wood; color, sound
Classifications
Highlights
Keywords
  • Object – written matter – map
  • Object – furniture – television
  • Landscape – United States
Object Number
2002.23
Palette
Linked Open Data
Linked Open Data URI

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1992
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1995
eight-channel video installation with custom electronics; color, sound
1963/1981
eleven fixed-image televisions

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