Kiss the Cook

  • Tommy Simpson, Kiss the Cook, 1992-1993, constructed spalted maple, English oak, figured soft maple, lacewood, cherry, walnut, mahogany, and bone, Smithsonian American Art Museum, © 1993, Tommy Simpson, Gift of Daphne Farago, 2000.94

Luce Center Label

Tommy Simpson designed this cupboard for the kitchen of a private residence in Key West, Florida. He carved on the front "Don’t forget to kiss the cook. It’s an old family recipe," a saying he heard from the patron of this cupboard. Simpson frequently incorporates words into his pieces to (depending on the situation) entertain, critique, or give the viewer something to contemplate. In Kiss the Cook, the use of words familiar to the patron personalizes an object intended for a room that has become a popular gathering place and the focal point in the modern home. The cabinet is further customized with references to Key West's island location: a wave pattern adorns the bottom and two fish "swim" along the front. Simpson has even carved the two front legs in the form of fish. The door at the top opens to reveal a small table and four miniature paintings, essentially rendering this part of the cupboard unusable for storage. This delightful surprise, however, is indicative of Simpson's work, as close examination is often rewarded with unexpected results.

Luce Object Quote
"One of the acts of artists is to delight people." The artist, quoted in Pamela Koob, Tommy Simpson, 1993
Title
Kiss the Cook
Artist
Date
1992-1993
On View
Dimensions
67 x 28 x 21 in. (170.2 x 71.1 x 53.3 cm)
Credit Line

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Gift of Daphne Farago

Mediums Description
constructed spalted maple, English oak, figured soft maple, lacewood, cherry, walnut, mahogany, and bone
Classifications
Keywords
  • Object – written matter
Object Number
2000.94
Palette
Linked Open Data
Linked Open Data URI

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