Apocalypse '42

  • Viktor Schreckengost, Apocalypse '42, 1942, terracotta and glaze with engobe, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of the artist, 1985.92.1

Exhibition Label

I've always felt that you can say more with one vivid cartoon than you can with a lot of heavy words. -- Viktor Schreckengost

Connections: Contemporary Craft at the Renwick Gallery, 2019

Luce Center Label

Viktor Schreckengost created Apocalypse '42 a few months after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. This image of a frightened horse bearing Hitler, Mussolini, Hirohito, and a figure of Death across the globe was made to protest the rise of fascism. The drips of bloodred glaze around the horse's head and hooves were an unintentional effect of the firing process.

Luce Object Quote
"I've always felt that you can say more with one vivid cartoon than you can with a lot of heavy words." Artist's statement
Title
Apocalypse '42
Artist
Date
1942
Location
Dimensions
15 3/8 x 20 3/8 x 8 1/8 in. (39.1 x 51.8 x 20.6 cm.)
Credit Line

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Gift of the artist

Mediums
Mediums Description
terracotta and glaze with engobe
Classifications
Keywords
  • Portrait male – Hitler, Adolf – caricature
  • Portrait male – Tojo – caricature
  • Portrait male – Mussolini – caricature
  • Religion – New Testament – Last Judgment
  • Allegory – civic – fascism
  • Allegory – death
Object Number
1985.92.1
Palette
Linked Open Data
Linked Open Data URI

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